Posted in BLOG, Poem, Writings

Pinch of Courage

Pinch of Courage

 

Like an electric volt

Flowing throughout my arteries

While it energized

The sleeping blood of mine

 

The presence of this feeling

Made my tears

Lurking on my eyelids

Showing desperately to fall

There is an excitement

Of giving a chance to know a person again

Yet, there’s a fear of falling

And maybe abandoned again

 

I hate this silly fear

Yet, I have no choice

But to face it

And defeat it

 

Because there’s no other way

For this lonely heart of mine

To occupy the felling of emptiness

If I let this fear swallow

The pinch of courage

Which I only remained…

Posted in BLOG, Poem, Writings

Moth – The Dreamer

Day 5: Writing 101

Prompt: Hook’em with a quote

“Life isn’t about finding yourself. Life is about creating yourself.”
George Bernard Shaw

Moth – The Dreamer

 

I am just a moth

Who dreamed to reach a star

And believed that someday I will

 

All I knew is to fly

With my little wings

And with my courageous heart

 

I can’t hear the voice of a coward

Because I locked it in soundproof box

I don’t want her to stop me

To reach the star

Which I was aiming to be

 

Yes, the moth sounds ambitious

But tell me my friend

When the dream was became void?

 

I had a hard time on making poem based from a quote. So I decided to make a poem first and looked for a quote which suited to my poem. Haha! It’s a kind of “solving a problem by reversing”.

I knew, I knew, I killed the rule for this assignment. 😀 . Tomorrow I will be a good girl, I promise. Just forgive me this time.

But hey! While searching for the exact quote for my poem, the quote of Bill Keane brought me a surprised;

“Yesterday is history, tomorrow is a mystery, today is a gift of God, which is why we call it the present.” ― Bil Keane.

Why? It’s because I had a feeling that I also had that line. Therefore I searched it from my blog and found this one;

“Yesterday” is an accomplishment, “Now” is a gift, “Tomorrow” is an adventure, But still to be a gift soon, And become another accomplishment” – Jeanix Angel

I can now breathe because I found out that lines were different. I’m afraid that Sir Bil Keane will sue me because of this. 🙂

Posted in BLOG, Poem, Writings

Regret

Day 3: Writing 101

Prompt: Regret

         

Regret

 

A groan of my forlorn soul

Alone in a gloomy room

Wondering why I felt so guilt

And a concreted reason

Is what I tried to penetrate

 

At first it was a vague imagination

Which was carefully touched my sensation

It was followed by my pique curiosity

Unbeknown by me

I was deviate from reality

 

I let myself deluded by the fantasies

Which must only exists on writer’s masterpiece

Or perhaps, it just so reticent

For me to admit

That I’ve been convicted

By a flaw, I regret

Yet, it’s too late

For me to repent…

Posted in BLOG, Poem, Writings

My Soundless Groan: I AM PHILIPPINES

Tenth assignment from Writing 201: Poetry

Day 10: Pleasure, Sonnet, Apostrophe

My Soundless Groan: I AM PHILIPPINES

*

I posses an aesthetic visage

A home of vintage

My head always up high, for the

Purity I acquired

Humanity is always my priority

Integrity that I always deserves, because

Love I always preserves, then

Intolerant knocks my door

Pensive, yes I am

Powerless to overcome

Independence what my voiceless screamed for, coz I am

Nervous about my future

Egocentric, yes they are… please…

Save me from selfish damn!

*

Let a shallow woman talks: I am very proud that I lived in a wonderful place. A place which posses the marvelous beauty of nature. Despite of this blessed beauty that my country has, she silently groaning from the incurable disease –corruption.

After hearing the numerous numbers of candidates for President (53 candidates, if I’m not wrong), I can’t help myself to loss the devilish grin over my face. This was my first time that I heard that presidential position has 53 candidates. My heart dropped after I sank my thoughts about the possible reasons why we have this numerous candidates. People were so desperate for changes! How pity my country is. Obviously, my poor nation is on ill.

Updated: 10/17/15 – Total of 130 running for president (YahooNews)

Ok, too much for the drama. This is the last task for Writing201: Poetry. This class became a big part for my journey in poetry. I should say thank you WordPress- The Commons for this free short course and also to @ Ben Huberman and his colleagues. And of course to all friendly-gorgeous-gifted-funny-amazing poets out there, thank you for sharing and comments and likes and also thank you for friendship. Hope to see you in November class: Writing101: Finding Daily Inspiration.

Sounds dramatic again? Ok, let’s take it seriously funny (for me, it’s up to you). 🙂

As you can see my post was in acrostic form. Why? Simply because I am a late bloomer. Sounds fair? 🙂 . Honestly, on our second assignment, before I understood what’s an acrostic was, I’ve done making my poem. Therefore, I put an “optional” at the side of acrostic word. Save by the “optional”. 🙂 . I wish I hit the three requirements for this day; Pleasure, Sonnets and apostrophe. Have you seen the pleasure in poem? Let me make it bold: “It’s my pleasure to share what really I wanted to say for this day”. 😀

“Enjoy our Gift. God provides.”

-Jeanix Angel –

Day 9: When Love Becomes Cold

Day 8: Strange Flavour

Day 7: Neighbour’s Party

Day 6: Facing Adversities

Day 5: A Frozen Heart

Day 4: Imperfect Perfection

Day 3: Perceiving Behind the Feather

Day 2: Life as a Gift

Day 1: Justice for a Chick

Terms introduced by Writing 201: Poetry.

Check Poetry Foundation for more poetic terms.

  1. Sonnet – is normally composed of 14 lines of verse. There are several ways you can split your sonnet into stanzas (if you wish to), though the most common ones are 8-6 and 4-4-3-3. Likewise, if you decide to use rhyme in your sonnet, you can choose between various rhyming schemes, like ABAB BCBC CDCD EE, ABAB CDCD EFEF GG, or ABBA ABBA CDC DCD, among others.
  2. Apostrophe– can produce such a striking effect in a poem: it occurs when the speaker in the poem addresses another person or an object (usually personified) directly.
  3. Epistrophe -is its counterpart: the repeated words appear at the end of lines. Like most simple devices, though, the trick is in deploying them to their full effect. Repetition lends emphasis to words, adds weight, and leaves a deeper imprint in your readers’ memories. Think wisely about what it is you’re underlining.
  4. Anaphora- simply means the repetition of the same word (or cluster of words) at the beginning of multiple lines of verse in the same poem.
  5. Concrete Poetry– Generally speaking, any poem that’s typographically arranged to represent a specific shape (recognizable or not) is a concrete, or “shape” poem.
  6. Enumeration- its name might suggest, it basically means constructing a list, a successive enumeration of multiple elements in the same series.
  7. Elegy– originally requiring specific meters, nowadays elegies come in all shapes and sizes, though they are united by their (often melancholic) focus on loss and longing.
  8. Ballads- are dramatic, emotionally-charged poems that tell a story, often about bigger-than-life characters and situations.
  9. Assonance- is subtler than alliteration, but can have a profound cumulative effect on a poem, especially when the repeated sound resonates somehow with the topic you’re writing about.
  10. Chiasmus- is essentially a reversal, an inverted crossing (it got its name from the greek letter chi – X).
  11. Found poem – is composed of words and letters you’ve collected — randomly or not — from other sources, whether printed, handwritten, or digital, and then (re)arranged into something meaningful.
  12. Ode-is a laudatory poem celebrating a person, an object, a place, etc. In the past, odes followed strict formal requirements — like the (Greek) Pindaric ode or the (Latin) Horatian ode. These days (and for quite some time), odes can come in all forms and sizes — it’s the subject matter that tends to distinguish a poem as an ode.
  13. Metaphor-brings together two terms that aren’t normally connected, yet make sense once they are (its greek roots mean “to carry over”). Unlike its less subtle cousin, the simile, metaphors don’t need connectors like “as” and “like” to link the two things together. They just smash them into each other and hope for the best.
  14. Enjambment – It may sound like a mouthful. But what it describes is a really simple phenomenon: when a grammatical sentence stretches from one line of verse to the next.
  15. Limericks – are traditionally composed of five lines of verse. The traditional rhyming scheme of a limerick is a a b b a — the first two lines rhyme, then the next two, and the final verse rhymes with the first couplet.
  16. Prose poetryany piece of verse written using the normal typography of prose, while style maintaining elements of poetry, like rhythm, imagery, etc.
  17. Internal Rhyme – the poetic device on offer for your exploration today — should appeal to all poets. It adds a level of sonic complexity and playfulness without calling too much attention to itself the way end rhymes (i.e. rhymes appearing at the end of verses) do.
  18. Acrostic – A poem in which the first letter of each line spells out a word, name, or phrase when read vertically. See Lewis Carroll’s “A Boat beneath a Sunny Sky.”
  19. Simile – A comparison (see Metaphor) made with “as,” “like,” or “than.” In “A Red, Red Rose,”
  20. Haiku– A traditional Japanese form, now popular around the world. Normally (but not necessarily) composed of three lines of verse containing five, seven, and five syllables, respectively.
  21. Alliteration– The repetition of initial stressed, consonant sounds in a series of words within a phrase or verse line. Alliteration need not reuse all initial consonants; “pizza” and “place” alliterate. Example: “We saw the sea sound sing, we heard the salt sheet tell,” from Dylan Thomas’s “Lie Still, Sleep Becalmed.” Browse poems with alliteration.

*Terms and meanings credited to Poetry Foundation.

Thanks for stopping by! 🙂

Posted in BLOG, Poem, Writings

When Love Becomes Cold

Ninth assignment from Writing 201: Poetry

Day 9: Cold, Concrete Poetry, Epistrophe /Anaphora

When Love Becomes Cold

*

When love becomes cold

No sweet words to be told

No warm hands to hold

When love becomes cold

Pain becomes bold

*

When pain becomes bold

Emotions uncontrolled

Tears you can’t withhold

When pain becomes bold

Smile you can’t behold

*

When smile you can’t behold

Can’t appreciates the beauty of the world

Can’t see the person’s hearth’s precious gold

When smile you can’t behold

Love becomes cold…

*

I’m a bit sick this night. Gladly I still finished this task.

Head ache. Stiff neck. Cold. Rain. Gloomy room. Lonely room. Yawn. Locked jaw. Outch!!!

  • bad internet connection. Sigh.

Checkout my daily poem:

Day 8: Strange Flavour

Day 7: Neighbour’s Party

Day 6: Facing Adversities

Day 5: A Frozen Heart

Day 4: Imperfect Perfection

Day 3: Perceiving Behind the Feather

Day 2: Life as a Gift

Day 1: Justice for a Chick

Terms introduced by Writing 102: Poetry.

Check Poetry Foundation for more poetic terms.

  1. Epistrophe -is its counterpart: the repeated words appear at the end of lines. Like most simple devices, though, the trick is in deploying them to their full effect. Repetition lends emphasis to words, adds weight, and leaves a deeper imprint in your readers’ memories. Think wisely about what it is you’re underlining.
  2. Anaphora- simply means the repetition of the same word (or cluster of words) at the beginning of multiple lines of verse in the same poem.
  3. Concrete Poetry– Generally speaking, any poem that’s typographically arranged to represent a specific shape (recognizable or not) is a concrete, or “shape” poem.
  4. Enumeration- its name might suggest, it basically means constructing a list, a successive enumeration of multiple elements in the same series.
  5. Elegy– originally requiring specific meters, nowadays elegies come in all shapes and sizes, though they are united by their (often melancholic) focus on loss and longing.
  6. Ballads- are dramatic, emotionally-charged poems that tell a story, often about bigger-than-life characters and situations.
  7. Assonance- is subtler than alliteration, but can have a profound cumulative effect on a poem, especially when the repeated sound resonates somehow with the topic you’re writing about.
  8. Chiasmus- is essentially a reversal, an inverted crossing (it got its name from the greek letter chi – X).
  9. Found poem – is composed of words and letters you’ve collected — randomly or not — from other sources, whether printed, handwritten, or digital, and then (re)arranged into something meaningful.
  10. Ode-is a laudatory poem celebrating a person, an object, a place, etc. In the past, odes followed strict formal requirements — like the (Greek) Pindaric ode or the (Latin) Horatian ode. These days (and for quite some time), odes can come in all forms and sizes — it’s the subject matter that tends to distinguish a poem as an ode.
  11. Metaphor-brings together two terms that aren’t normally connected, yet make sense once they are (its greek roots mean “to carry over”). Unlike its less subtle cousin, the simile, metaphors don’t need connectors like “as” and “like” to link the two things together. They just smash them into each other and hope for the best.
  12. Enjambment – It may sound like a mouthful. But what it describes is a really simple phenomenon: when a grammatical sentence stretches from one line of verse to the next.
  13. Limericks – are traditionally composed of five lines of verse. The traditional rhyming scheme of a limerick is a a b b a — the first two lines rhyme, then the next two, and the final verse rhymes with the first couplet.
  14. Prose poetryany piece of verse written using the normal typography of prose, while style maintaining elements of poetry, like rhythm, imagery, etc.
  15. Internal Rhyme – the poetic device on offer for your exploration today — should appeal to all poets. It adds a level of sonic complexity and playfulness without calling too much attention to itself the way end rhymes (i.e. rhymes appearing at the end of verses) do.
  16. Acrostic – A poem in which the first letter of each line spells out a word, name, or phrase when read vertically. See Lewis Carroll’s “A Boat beneath a Sunny Sky.”
  17. Simile – A comparison (see Metaphor) made with “as,” “like,” or “than.” In “A Red, Red Rose,”
  18. Haiku– A traditional Japanese form, now popular around the world. Normally (but not necessarily) composed of three lines of verse containing five, seven, and five syllables, respectively.
  19. Alliteration– The repetition of initial stressed, consonant sounds in a series of words within a phrase or verse line. Alliteration need not reuse all initial consonants; “pizza” and “place” alliterate. Example: “We saw the sea sound sing, we heard the salt sheet tell,” from Dylan Thomas’s “Lie Still, Sleep Becalmed.” Browse poems with alliteration.

*Terms and meanings credited to Poetry Foundation.

when love becomes cold

Thanks for stopping by! 🙂

Posted in Author's Opinions, BLOG, Writings

Versatile Bloggers Award

versatilebloggernominations

I received a “Versatile Blogger Award” from a generous and gifted blogger; Paul. I appreciate your recognition and for putting me on the top of the list. 😀 . Thank you so much. Visit his website to experience his world of thoughts: https://wwwpalfitness.wordpress.com/.

Award Rules:

If you are nominated, you’ve been awarded the Versatile Blogger award.

  •  Thank the person who gave you this award. That’s common courtesy.
  •  Include a link to their blog. That’s also common courtesy — if you can figure out how to do it.
  •  Next, select 15 blogs/bloggers that you’ve recently discovered or follow regularly. ( I would add, pick blogs or bloggers that are excellent!) It doesn’t say it in the rules but notify your nominations in one of their posts
  •  Nominate those 15 bloggers for the Versatile Blogger Award — you might include a link to the original site.
  •  Finally, tell the person who nominated you 7 things about yourself.

Another Seven Facts about me:

  1. When I read this “Versatile”, I searched the meaning in goggle. 🙂 . Hey! English is not my first language, ok. I don’t have boxes of vocabulary on my head. (An excuse. 😀 )
  2. Three times of being a bride’s maid but never been a bride. I have eight god children but never been a mother. 🙂
  3. I have a talent envy; dancing. I don’t know why my brain and my body didn’t coordinate each other.
  4. First time I ride an elevator when I was in college. 🙂
  5. Fist time I ride an airplane was last 2013. 😀
  6. I have time management problem. 🙂 . But I am currently working for it. Whaattta bad habit…
  7. Woke up 7:00; Work 8:30-5:30; arrived home around 7pm; surfing in net, blogging, reading, and then sleep mostly 12 midnight.

My nominees: Can I have just five? 🙂

  1. https://peoplethingsandlife.wordpress.com/
  2. https://gilhooley52.wordpress.com/
  3. http://richardankers.com/
  4. http://travelingrockhopper.com/
  5. http://cristianmihai.net/

Enjoy the gift of God guys! We are special… 🙂

Posted in BLOG, Poem, Writings

Strange Flavours

Eighth assignment from Writing 201: Poetry

Day 8: Flavor, Elegy, Enumeration

Strange Flavours

How your taste bud does responds?

From the taste of meals you had?

Craving for sweets? Savoury? Syrupy?

What about a sharp of bitter? Or Spicy?

*

How your heart does responds?

From the taste of love you had?

Does it giggled from sweetness? Caress?

What about from heartbreaks? Pains?

*

Now, how are you going to responds?

From the taste of life you had?

Embracing victory? Wealthy?

What about during failures? Frailty?

*

Strange flavour in meals

Ones tasted, not strange at all

Strange circumstances in cycle of life

Once experienced, it’s your profit at all!

*

I’m done. So sleepy. Almost one eye open. Just not to get absent. 🙂

Checkout my daily poem:

Day 7: Neighbour’s Party

Day 6: Facing Adversities

Day 5: A Frozen Heart

Day 4: Imperfect Perfection

Day 3: Perceiving Behind the Feather

Day 2: Life as a Gift

Day 1: Justice for a Chick

Terms introduced by Writing 102: Poetry.

Check Poetry Foundation for more poetic terms.

  1. Enumeration- its name might suggest, it basically means constructing a list, a successive enumeration of multiple elements in the same series.
  2. Elegy– originally requiring specific meters, nowadays elegies come in all shapes and sizes, though they are united by their (often melancholic) focus on loss and longing.
  3. Ballads- are dramatic, emotionally-charged poems that tell a story, often about bigger-than-life characters and situations.
  4. Assonance- is subtler than alliteration, but can have a profound cumulative effect on a poem, especially when the repeated sound resonates somehow with the topic you’re writing about.
  5. Chiasmus- is essentially a reversal, an inverted crossing (it got its name from the greek letter chi – X).
  6. Found poem – is composed of words and letters you’ve collected — randomly or not — from other sources, whether printed, handwritten, or digital, and then (re)arranged into something meaningful.
  7. Ode-is a laudatory poem celebrating a person, an object, a place, etc. In the past, odes followed strict formal requirements — like the (Greek) Pindaric ode or the (Latin) Horatian ode. These days (and for quite some time), odes can come in all forms and sizes — it’s the subject matter that tends to distinguish a poem as an ode.
  8. Metaphor-brings together two terms that aren’t normally connected, yet make sense once they are (its greek roots mean “to carry over”). Unlike its less subtle cousin, the simile, metaphors don’t need connectors like “as” and “like” to link the two things together. They just smash them into each other and hope for the best.
  9. Enjambment – It may sound like a mouthful. But what it describes is a really simple phenomenon: when a grammatical sentence stretches from one line of verse to the next.
  10. Limericks – are traditionally composed of five lines of verse. The traditional rhyming scheme of a limerick is a a b b a — the first two lines rhyme, then the next two, and the final verse rhymes with the first couplet.
  11. Prose poetryany piece of verse written using the normal typography of prose, while style maintaining elements of poetry, like rhythm, imagery, etc.
  12. Internal Rhyme – the poetic device on offer for your exploration today — should appeal to all poets. It adds a level of sonic complexity and playfulness without calling too much attention to itself the way end rhymes (i.e. rhymes appearing at the end of verses) do.
  13. Acrostic – A poem in which the first letter of each line spells out a word, name, or phrase when read vertically. See Lewis Carroll’s “A Boat beneath a Sunny Sky.”
  14. Simile – A comparison (see Metaphor) made with “as,” “like,” or “than.” In “A Red, Red Rose,”
  15. Haiku– A traditional Japanese form, now popular around the world. Normally (but not necessarily) composed of three lines of verse containing five, seven, and five syllables, respectively.
  16. Alliteration– The repetition of initial stressed, consonant sounds in a series of words within a phrase or verse line. Alliteration need not reuse all initial consonants; “pizza” and “place” alliterate. Example: “We saw the sea sound sing, we heard the salt sheet tell,” from Dylan Thomas’s “Lie Still, Sleep Becalmed.” Browse poems with alliteration.

*Terms and meanings credited to Poetry Foundation.

I am silent this night. No power at all… Lowbat on my own. 🙂

Posted in BLOG, Poem, Writings

Neighbour’s Party

Seventh assignment from Writing 201: Poetry

Day 7: Neighborhood, Ballad, Assonance

Neighbour’s Party

Traa.a. lalalalllaa…lalalaa

As my feet loved to moved from the beat

Of a loud sounds outside

Wondering what happened at the other side

Looking out the window

The table is on

The glass is ready

Galloons of native wine are coming

Come…come…. Come… come neighbours

Get ready for the party

Happy they are! Really!

Senior citizens forgot their back aches

Every time chachacha is playing

Their feet were so thirsty to follow the beat…

This is how our neighbours in every occasion

Having fun as if tomorrow never come

When they all drunk

They may dance a sway

Others may sing their favourite song

Others may sleep as if the street is so silent

If by lucky alcohol successfully went through his brain

His reasoning went drain

He then loves looking for his foe!

Tralalala..lalla…alalala..

Super hero’s moves are now live!

When his toes were slip

Tralalaa…lalla…lalallaa

Drunken super hero’s time to sleep!

*

Why is it so hard for me to spell out the word “neighbor? Until I finished writing this poem I keep on checking the suggested spelling because it always in red. 😀 Anyways, I had fun while making this piece. Did I bat the required requirements? Hmmnnn… 🙂

Checkout my daily poem:

Day 6: Facing Adversities

Day 5: A Frozen Heart

Day 4: Imperfect Perfection

Day 3: Perceiving Behind the Feather

Day 2: Life as a Gift

Day 1: Justice for a Chick

Terms introduced by Writing 102: Poetry.

Check Poetry Foundation for more poetic terms.

  1. Ballads- are dramatic, emotionally-charged poems that tell a story, often about bigger-than-life characters and situations.
  2. Assonance- is subtler than alliteration, but can have a profound cumulative effect on a poem, especially when the repeated sound resonates somehow with the topic you’re writing about.
  3. Chiasmus- is essentially a reversal, an inverted crossing (it got its name from the greek letter chi – X).
  4. Found poem – is composed of words and letters you’ve collected — randomly or not — from other sources, whether printed, handwritten, or digital, and then (re)arranged into something meaningful.
  5. Ode-is a laudatory poem celebrating a person, an object, a place, etc. In the past, odes followed strict formal requirements — like the (Greek) Pindaric ode or the (Latin) Horatian ode. These days (and for quite some time), odes can come in all forms and sizes — it’s the subject matter that tends to distinguish a poem as an ode.
  6. Metaphor-brings together two terms that aren’t normally connected, yet make sense once they are (its greek roots mean “to carry over”). Unlike its less subtle cousin, the simile, metaphors don’t need connectors like “as” and “like” to link the two things together. They just smash them into each other and hope for the best.
  7. Enjambment – It may sound like a mouthful. But what it describes is a really simple phenomenon: when a grammatical sentence stretches from one line of verse to the next.
  8. Limericks – are traditionally composed of five lines of verse. The traditional rhyming scheme of a limerick is a a b b a — the first two lines rhyme, then the next two, and the final verse rhymes with the first couplet.
  9. Prose poetryany piece of verse written using the normal typography of prose, while style maintaining elements of poetry, like rhythm, imagery, etc.
  10. Internal Rhyme – the poetic device on offer for your exploration today — should appeal to all poets. It adds a level of sonic complexity and playfulness without calling too much attention to itself the way end rhymes (i.e. rhymes appearing at the end of verses) do.
  11. Acrostic – A poem in which the first letter of each line spells out a word, name, or phrase when read vertically. See Lewis Carroll’s “A Boat beneath a Sunny Sky.”
  12. Simile – A comparison (see Metaphor) made with “as,” “like,” or “than.” In “A Red, Red Rose,”
  13. Haiku– A traditional Japanese form, now popular around the world. Normally (but not necessarily) composed of three lines of verse containing five, seven, and five syllables, respectively.
  14. Alliteration– The repetition of initial stressed, consonant sounds in a series of words within a phrase or verse line. Alliteration need not reuse all initial consonants; “pizza” and “place” alliterate. Example: “We saw the sea sound sing, we heard the salt sheet tell,” from Dylan Thomas’s “Lie Still, Sleep Becalmed.” Browse poems with alliteration.

*Terms and meanings credited to Poetry Foundation.

*

Thank you for stopping by. I hope you enjoy.

Good night for now.

“Yesterday” is an accomplishment

“Now” is a gift

“Tomorrow” is an adventure

But still to be a gift soon

And become another accomplishment”

By: Jeanix Angel

Posted in BLOG, Poem, Writings

Facing Adversities

Sixth assignment from Writing 201: Poetry

Day 6: Faces, Found Poetry, Chiasmus

Facing Adversities

Adversities are part of life

Life adversities need to face

Whatever how hard is the case

Even the case makes hard to life.

*

Time comes you will learn

You learned at the right time

From the adversities you called “mine”

Ti’l you realize that it’s a best investment then.

*

Don’t be afraid when you face them

Let them afraid in you

Coz whatever these adversities will do

You know what to do to defeat them.

It’s so hard to look for words so I decided to make. And now it isn’t a “found words” anymore. It’s “made words”. 😀 . I am not also so sure about my poem! Gosh!

Checkout my daily poem:

Day 5: A Frozen Heart

Day 4: Imperfect Perfection

Day 3: Perceiving Behind the Feather

Day 2: Life as a Gift

Day 1: Justice for a Chick

Terms introduced by Writing 102: Poetry.

Check Poetry Foundation for more poetic terms.

  1. Chiasmus- is essentially a reversal, an inverted crossing (it got its name from the greek letter chi – X).
  2. Found poem – is composed of words and letters you’ve collected — randomly or not — from other sources, whether printed, handwritten, or digital, and then (re)arranged into something meaningful.
  3. Ode-is a laudatory poem celebrating a person, an object, a place, etc. In the past, odes followed strict formal requirements — like the (Greek) Pindaric ode or the (Latin) Horatian ode. These days (and for quite some time), odes can come in all forms and sizes — it’s the subject matter that tends to distinguish a poem as an ode.
  4. Metaphor-brings together two terms that aren’t normally connected, yet make sense once they are (its greek roots mean “to carry over”). Unlike its less subtle cousin, the simile, metaphors don’t need connectors like “as” and “like” to link the two things together. They just smash them into each other and hope for the best.
  5. Enjambment – It may sound like a mouthful. But what it describes is a really simple phenomenon: when a grammatical sentence stretches from one line of verse to the next.
  6. Limericks – are traditionally composed of five lines of verse. The traditional rhyming scheme of a limerick is a a b b a — the first two lines rhyme, then the next two, and the final verse rhymes with the first couplet.
  7. Prose poetryany piece of verse written using the normal typography of prose, while style maintaining elements of poetry, like rhythm, imagery, etc.
  8. Internal Rhyme – the poetic device on offer for your exploration today — should appeal to all poets. It adds a level of sonic complexity and playfulness without calling too much attention to itself the way end rhymes (i.e. rhymes appearing at the end of verses) do.
  9. Acrostic – A poem in which the first letter of each line spells out a word, name, or phrase when read vertically. See Lewis Carroll’s “A Boat beneath a Sunny Sky.”
  10. Simile – A comparison (see Metaphor) made with “as,” “like,” or “than.” In “A Red, Red Rose,”
  11. Haiku– A traditional Japanese form, now popular around the world. Normally (but not necessarily) composed of three lines of verse containing five, seven, and five syllables, respectively.
  12. Alliteration– The repetition of initial stressed, consonant sounds in a series of words within a phrase or verse line. Alliteration need not reuse all initial consonants; “pizza” and “place” alliterate. Example: “We saw the sea sound sing, we heard the salt sheet tell,” from Dylan Thomas’s “Lie Still, Sleep Becalmed.” Browse poems with alliteration.

*Terms and meanings credited to Poetry Foundation.

Thank you for reading guys. Good luck for this assignment! It’s getting crunchier and crunchier. 😀 But we still need to face our assignment, whatever how hard is it.

“It’s hard to face the problem, if our problem is our face” 😀

adversitieskkk

Posted in BLOG, Poem, Writings

The Frozen Heart

Fifth assignment from Writing 201: Poetry

Day 5: Map, Ode, Metaphor

A Frozen Heart

Once a heart was frozen

From the past who stole the future

Longing for love like before

*

Until a sin was forgiven

By the weary heart of hope

Like a blind who depends from his grope

*

Then a frost of heart melts in time

And sadly was covered with a soft lime

So loss from its grip and became so fragile

Yet became more vigilant and agile

Until this frozen heart found its future

Hopefully, a love which she longing even before

*

Gosh! I’m not sure if I bashed the three requirements. I love the guys who gave this prompt! 🙂 . They made me sleep too late. It’s getting harder and harder, yet it’s getting more exciting and more challenging.

Checkout my daily poem:

Day 4: Imperfect Perfection

Day 3: Perceiving Behind the Feather

Day 2: Life as a Gift

Day 1: Justice for a Chick

Terms introduced by Writing 102: Poetry.

Check Poetry Foundation for more poetic terms.

  1. Ode-is a laudatory poem celebrating a person, an object, a place, etc. In the past, odes followed strict formal requirements — like the (Greek) Pindaric ode or the (Latin) Horatian ode. These days (and for quite some time), odes can come in all forms and sizes — it’s the subject matter that tends to distinguish a poem as an ode.
  2. Metaphor-brings together two terms that aren’t normally connected, yet make sense once they are (its greek roots mean “to carry over”). Unlike its less subtle cousin, the simile, metaphors don’t need connectors like “as” and “like” to link the two things together. They just smash them into each other and hope for the best.
  3. Enjambment – It may sound like a mouthful. But what it describes is a really simple phenomenon: when a grammatical sentence stretches from one line of verse to the next.
  4. Limericks – are traditionally composed of five lines of verse. The traditional rhyming scheme of a limerick is a a b b a — the first two lines rhyme, then the next two, and the final verse rhymes with the first couplet.
  5. Prose poetryany piece of verse written using the normal typography of prose, while style maintaining elements of poetry, like rhythm, imagery, etc.
  6. Internal Rhyme – the poetic device on offer for your exploration today — should appeal to all poets. It adds a level of sonic complexity and playfulness without calling too much attention to itself the way end rhymes (i.e. rhymes appearing at the end of verses) do.
  7. Acrostic – A poem in which the first letter of each line spells out a word, name, or phrase when read vertically. See Lewis Carroll’s “A Boat beneath a Sunny Sky.”
  8. Simile – A comparison (see Metaphor) made with “as,” “like,” or “than.” In “A Red, Red Rose,”
  9. Haiku– A traditional Japanese form, now popular around the world. Normally (but not necessarily) composed of three lines of verse containing five, seven, and five syllables, respectively.
  10. Alliteration– The repetition of initial stressed, consonant sounds in a series of words within a phrase or verse line. Alliteration need not reuse all initial consonants; “pizza” and “place” alliterate. Example: “We saw the sea sound sing, we heard the salt sheet tell,” from Dylan Thomas’s “Lie Still, Sleep Becalmed.” Browse poems with alliteration.

*Terms and meanings credited to Poetry Foundation.

Thank you for reading. No quotes for today because I am so sleepy… 😀